Twitter more prevalent in journalism

A student journalist takes a break from all the hard work. Lila Alvarado browses Twitter on her phone.

A student journalist takes a break from all the hard work. Lila Alvarado browses Twitter on her phone.

Summer Cutler, Reporter

The day dragged on, then all at once, junior Kayla Hoppe’s phone chimed. After six long hours of waiting, Hoppe’s twitter account’s notifications showed that she held an honorable mention from the Kansas Scholastic Press Association.

“I’m not constantly on twitter, but that was how KSPA was sending out the news, so I was checking it every minute,” Hoppe said.

Twitter is social hub of the era. With it being worth around $20 billion and having about 255 million active members a month, it is not hard to imagine that somewhere, on that massive social networking site, a journalist can harness the power to make a name for herself.

“It was cool to be honored like that in front of so many people,” Hoppe said. “Our school newspaper retweeted it and all of my friends saw it.”

MediaNowSTL Event Director Kate Manfull said, “Twitter is a resource, a gathering tool.”

Manfull said that everyone should make a twitter account that supports their journalism. “You can become a beacon of resource, a value.” Manfull said.

“Share that you are a real person, you have interest,” Manfull said. Yet all too often people get themselves in trouble with what they post on twitter.

“There’s a fine line between getting too personal and keeping it business.” Manfull said. “What you say matters, it’s there and won’t go away. It can be a great resource if you use it correctly.”

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